It sucks to be me. Or?

2017 was a year for loss. My husband lost his daughter to suicide. I lost my good health to breast cancer. A cataract surgery didn’t go well, and I lost my ability to read on the computer. We lost our financial confidence with an IRS audit.

Most of this year has been spent finding solutions. We are healing from our losses, and working through solutions to the problems that can be solved:

  • Our faith and love for our family help us deal with losing our daughter.
  • I had surgery, plus radiation. I’m now slated for 5 years taking a cancer-inhibiting drug. (I’m working through the side effects of the drug.)
  • My eyesight is better – with time, vitamins and new prescription glasses.
  • The IRS situation is being handled – at a snail’s pace – with the help of an Enrolled Agent.

I might say that it all turned out well. Of course, it didn’t. This year, there were car accidents, a back surgery, deaths in the family, and what not. That’s life.

When we experience loss—whether it’s an injury, a death, disease, a divorce, or a job loss—it’s natural to connect the dots to all the other losses and say, “It sucks to be me. I’m the victim here.”

Finding solace in family, friendships and faith – that is the great challenge and triumph of this life.

The way out is action. Here are some actions that have helped me:

  1. Keep a gratitude journal. Write down what you are grateful for. It can be as simple as that Starbucks coupon you got in the mail today, or the beautiful sunrise. Be grateful for those who love you and enrich your life. Be grateful for the crazy, rich, interesting life you’ve had.
  2. Feed your mind. Instead of watching junk on TV, go for a walk and listen to something inspiring. You could start with another three of my favorites—Mike Dooley, Sonia Choquette and Abraham-Hicks. You are what you think about. Choose better thoughts, and soon the habit of thinking positively will grow.
  3. See your career (and your life) as a challenge—and a work in progress. You might be on a slight detour right now, but nothing is lost. You have every experience—intact—in your brain. You have learned so much—and you have so much to give.
  4. Meet new people. Go to a job club and learn new ways to seek work. I recommend Launchpad Job Club, Hired Texas and Job Seekers Network. Invite a new contact to coffee. Go to a church and see how it feels to be in community. Join a Meet-Up and explore a new body of knowledge. New people bring you new ideas, new hope, new knowledge—and love.

You’re a survivor. You’ve made a habit of living well. Carry on.

With love,

Catherine Jewell
The Career Passion® Coach

PS: When you work with me, we look at your whole life and find all kinds of solutions, some career-focused, and some not. If you’d like to talk about your challenges, I invite you to schedule a Career Strategy Session with me. No cost, no pressure. Just empathy and some gentle advice.

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